Coronavirus: Here’s how you can stop bad information from going viral

Coronavirus: Here’s how you can stop bad information from going viralBy Flora Carmichael and Marianna SpringBBC Trending

  • 17 April 2020

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Graphic of a hand holding a phone with social media apps and germs nearby.

Coronavirus misinformation is flooding the internet and experts are calling on the public to practise “information hygiene”. What can you do to stop the spread of bad information?

1. Stop and think

You want to help family and friends and keep them in the loop. So when you receive fresh advice – whether by email, WhatsApp, Facebook or Twitter – you might quickly forward it on to them.

But experts say the number one thing you can do to halt misinformation is to simply stop and think.

If you have any doubts, pause, and check it out further.

Graphic shows a mobile phone with "fake news" on it being cleaned by tiny cleaners.

2. Check your source

Before you forward it on, ask some basic questions about where the information comes from.

Read full articleCoronavirus: Here’s how you can stop bad information from going viralCoronavirus: The people fighting fakes from their sofasBy Marianna SpringSpecialist disinformation reporter

  • 10 April 2020

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Photo illustration of an information sleuth

Social media companies are struggling to contain a wave of coronavirus misinformation. Into the breach have stepped volunteers who are fighting to stop rumours, bad advice and conspiracy theories from going viral.

Rachael Hogg is currently juggling her busy job as a project manager and teaching her nine-year-old from her home in the market town of Morpeth, about 15 miles north of Newcastle.

Read full articleCoronavirus: The people fighting fakes from their sofasCoronavirus: Here’s how you can stop bad information from going viralBy Flora Carmichael and Marianna SpringBBC Trending

  • 27 March 2020

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Graphic of a hand holding a phone with social media apps and germs nearby.

Coronavirus misinformation is flooding the internet and experts are calling on the public to practise “information hygiene”. What can you do to stop the spread of bad information?

1. Stop and think

You want to help family and friends and keep them in the loop. So when you receive fresh advice – whether by email, WhatsApp, Facebook or Twitter – you might quickly forward it on to them.

Read full articleCoronavirus: Here’s how you can stop bad information from going viralCoronavirus: How bad information goes viralBy Olga Robinson and Marianna SpringBBC Monitoring and BBC Trending

  • 19 March 2020

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Graphic of social media and virus

There’s a huge amount of misleading information circulating online about coronavirus – from dodgy health tips to speculation about government plans. This is the story of how one post went viral.

It’s a list of tips and advice – some true, some benign, and some possibly harmful – which has been circulating on Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, and elsewhere.

Read full articleCoronavirus: How bad information goes viralGeneral election 2019: What’s the evidence that Russia interfered?By Marco SilvaIn-depth reporting on social media

  • 11 March 2020

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Illustration of confidential UK government documents held in front of a Russian flag.

A leak of confidential UK government documents in the run-up to last December’s general election has been blamed on Russian actors. But what evidence is there to say the Russian government itself tried to interfere in British politics?

With just about two weeks to go before election day, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn revealed a trove of confidential documents outlining talks between UK and US officials about a possible future trade deal.

Read full articleGeneral election 2019: What’s the evidence that Russia interfered?Coronavirus: Iran holy-shrine-lickers face prisonBy Rozina Sini & Armen ShahbazianUGC Newsgathering & BBC Monitoring

  • 3 March 2020

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Iranian sanitary workers disinfect Qom's Masumeh shrine

Two men in Iran who defied coronavirus health warnings could be jailed and flogged after videos circulated of them licking holy shrines.

In one of the videos, viewed more than a million times on Instagram, a man is seen at the Masumeh shrine in Qom, saying, “I’m not scared of coronavirus”, before licking and kissing the gates.

man licking holy shrine in Qom Iran
Image captionThe man says he filmed the clip before the coronavirus outbreak in Iran

Read full articleCoronavirus: Iran holy-shrine-lickers face prisonJake Paul criticised after anxiety advice tweetBy Chris BellBBC News

  • 18 February 2020

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Jake Paul

Jake Paul has been heavily criticised after telling Twitter followers to “remember anxiety is created by you”.

His comments provoked a strong reaction online, where people suffering from anxiety condemned the “dangerous” advice.

Read full articleJake Paul criticised after anxiety advice tweetCaroline Flack: ‘Be kind,’ social-media users urgeBy BBC NewsStaff

  • 17 February 2020

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Instagram quote: "In a world where you can be anything, be kind".

“In a world where you can be anything, be kind,” Caroline Flack wrote on Instagram in December.

There is no simple explanation for why someone chooses to take their own life and it is rarely due to one particular factor. But after the 40-year-old TV presenter was found on Saturday, those words have assumed an added resonance for many.

Read full articleCaroline Flack: ‘Be kind,’ social-media users urgeFacebook removes ‘foreign interference’ operations from Iran and RussiaBy Olga Robinson and Shayan SardarizadehBBC Monitoring

  • 14 February 2020

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A collection of samples provided by Facebook of the content posted by the two operations
Image captionFacebook said both operations acted “on behalf of a government or foreign actor”

Facebook has removed two separate networks of fake accounts originating in Iran and Russia, for “engaging in foreign or government interference”. 

The Russian operation, which Facebook linked to the country’s military intelligence services, focused primarily on Ukraine and neighbouring countries.

Read full articleFacebook removes ‘foreign interference’ operations from Iran and RussiaCoronavirus: The Valentine messages to medics in SingaporeBy Rozina SiniBBC News

  • 13 February 2020

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Thank you for saving lives and keeping Singapore safe
Image captionJudith Perera-Lee says some of her friends and relatives are medical workers

People in Singapore are thanking healthcare workers on the frontline of the coronavirus outbreak with handwritten notes for Valentine’s Day.

Singapore has reported 50 cases of the virus, and the government has stepped up measures to detect and contain its spread.

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